More Than Finances

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Four Tips To Help You Nail The Job Interview

Remember that WaMu commercial a few years ago, where the guy walks late into a meeting and says “Sorry I’m late, I had a job interview – nailed it!”? Hilarious!

But how many of us are actually that confident?

Having applied and interviewed for numerous jobs in my career, I know there’s a lot for me to learn to become a good interviewer. Why? Because I didn’t get most of those jobs!

If you’re anything like me, the interview can be a nerve-wracking experience. Nonetheless, if you want the job, you need to go through it.
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Working Overtime – A Blessing Or A Curse?

Working Overtime - A Blessing Or A Curse
What would you do if you were asked to work overtime? Jump at the opportunity? Protest adamantly?

How do you decide if working overtime is worth it? It may not be an easy decision to make. Here are some factors to consider when arriving at a decision.



Pay

This is probably the most important factor. How do you know if you get paid to work overtime? Find out if you’re an exempt or non-exempt employee.

If you’re non-exempt, you’ll get paid for overtime. And not only do you get paid for those extra hours, but it’s at a rate of one and a half (1.5) times hour hourly wage. Not a bad deal at all.

If you’re exempt, then unfortunately you’re not entitled to overtime pay.

Purpose Of The Extra Money

If you do get paid for working overtime, do you need the extra money? What would you do with it?

Treat yourself to something nice? Pay off debt? Build up an emergency savings account? Invest for the future?

From reading Your Money Or Your Life, you know that you trade your time and energy for money. If you don’t need the money, maybe you could decline the overtime and put that extra time to better use. What about strengthening your relationships with family and friends? Getting more exercise? Working on a side-business?

Family

If you have a family, consider their input. How will they respond to your decision to work overtime?

Will they be okay with having less time to hang out with you, doing some of the things you usually do together after work? Things such as preparing dinner? Helping the kids with homework? Taking care of the parents?

If you can talk through these issues and come to a resolution that everyone feels good about, then working overtime won’t have a negative effect on your family life.

Health

Do you think the extra hours will have an adverse effect on your health? I did a Google search on working overtime, and some of the top results showed reports that working overtime may be harmful to your heart.

Personally, I can’t say I truly know how stressful working overtime could be, because I don’t like working any longer than 40 hours a week!!!

Could added stress lead to more doctor visits? Could this in turn lead to bigger doctor’s bills, and thus throw away the extra money you just earned?

Time

How much overtime are they asking you to work? How long is it expected to last? If you can get clear expectations from your boss, this may help you in reaching your decision.

Perhaps five extra hours a week for a month or two is okay for you. On the other hand, ten extra hours a week for three months may not be worth it to you.

Opportunity

Maybe this is a chance to build up your list of accomplishments. Could this lead to better opportunities in the future? When your review comes up, could you point to the extra work you completed as a reason to deserve a raise?

What other factors would affect your decision to work overtime? How would you respond if you were asked to work overtime?

This article was included in the Carnival of Personal Finance during the week of May 24, 2010. Check out Adam’s Money Relationship blog for a variety of great articles!

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Negotiating Your Salary: How To Make $1000 A Minute by Jack Chapman | Book Review

If you’re like most people, when you look for a job, you usually want the highest salary you can get. But when it comes to negotiating salary, you may be nervous, unprepared, and end up just accepting whatever salary is offered. I know that straight out of college, I took an offer from the first company that would hire me out of sheer desperation!

Fortunately, since then I’ve learned a few things about salary negotiation. And while I’m no expert at it, I was able to use some of the techniques in this book to get a higher salary in my current position than what was originally budgeted. So if you’re not an expert either, learning some of these techniques may help you too.

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