Getting that Pay Rise without Having to Ask – 5 Top Tips

Times are tough right now, and the odds of getting a pay rise, much less keeping a job, are low. Still, some businesses are going strong, and if you’ve worked hard for a significant amount of time, you might just deserve it.

The best way to get a raise is to ask for one. Bosses tend to not be thrilled by suggestive hints and knowing jokes, but there are a few things you can do to make it seem like it’s your their idea. Here are 5 tips for getting a little closer to that pay rise you’ve been waiting for.

Be confident

If you’ve arranged to meet your boss and discuss your place in the company, don’t go for the wilting flower route. Most bosses will immediately turn you down if you take the “I’m broke and I need the cash” route. Anything you can do to show your confidence is a plus. Be it going through your past successes or throwing on a new shift dress, if it works, it works.

Research

Don’t just go in willy-nilly. If you’re going to put yourself in a position to get a pay hike, know the facts. Research similar size companies to find out what the equivalent pay is, so when it comes down to talking numbers you know what to say. Look into how your firm is doing against competitors to make sure it’s viable for them to offer you more.

Timing is everything

As with anything, the when is as important as the why. You should not only ensure that the company is doing well, but that you are too. If you’re about to come to the end of a large project, which you feel you’re largely responsible for and it has gone well, then timing may be perfect.

Be realistic

Don’t go in expecting the moon and the stars. Remember your research and know when the time is right, and what the fair amount you can expect is. At the same time, don’t undervalue yourself and make sure you get the credit you deserve.

Keep at it

Times are tough, and sometimes things aren’t going to go your way.  Bosses tend to agree that the best advertisement for your worth to the company, is the work you put in. So if your first try isn’t successful, keep at it. When it comes to your performance review 6 months later, you’ll have the added ammunition to request the earnings you think you deserve.